Chain of Responsibility (CoR) Compliance and Enforcement Legislation

CoR

Legislation was passed by the Government of Western Australian in May 2012 following consultation between the Department of Transport, WA Police and Main Roads WA. Regulations were posted to the Main Roads website in December 2014 and became effective on Monday 27 April 2015.

What is Chain of Responsibility? If you use road transport as part of your business, you share the responsibility of managing the risk. The new state legislation will, for the first time, place obligations on all parties in the road transport supply chain. This means anyone who has control in the transport chain – including the consignor, loader and receiver – can be held accountable if, by their actions, inactions or decisions, they cause or contribute to a breach of the road laws.

Why has the Chain of Responsibility legislation been introduced? The laws have been introduced in the interests of national consistency in order to:

  • improve road safety;
  • reduce damage to infrastructure;
  • promote a ‘level playing field’ for industry
  • improve deterrence and enforcement; and
  • improve business efficiency and compliance

The following resources have been produced by Main Roads Heavy Vehicle Operations to assist you:

For further detailed information and updates, visit the Main Roads WA Chain of Responsibility page.

CoR Prosecutions

Download Fact Sheet 2 – Main Roads CoR prosecutions, September 2016

CoR Resource Videos

These videos were produced by the SA Department of Transport, Energy and Infrastructure to accompany the introduction of CoR legislation there. They are also relevant to WA CoR legislation and are a useful resource for toolbox meetings. Videos 1, 7 and 9 have not been added as they refer to dates, enforcement powers and penalties specific to SA.